Raw, Cooked, or Kibble?

In the last years of Max’s life, the vet was more and more often recommending a cooked diet to help ease Max’s digestive upsets. I’d cook some chicken or hamburger and rice, feed this home-cooked stew to Max, and he’d quickly improve.

I’d say to the vet, “I think I’ll just keep Max on this diet because he’s doing so well.”

And the vet would reply, “Oh, no. He needs his kibble to ensure a balanced diet.”

Back and forth, round and round we’d go. Max would improve on the home-cooked diet and relapse on the kibble.

Not to mention that Max¬†loved¬†the home-cooked selections. I just couldn’t see how dried kibble that could sit out for months, if not years, and still be “edible” was better for Max than real food. Nervously I continued to feed Max his chicken and rice, and I hope my choice made his last years more comfortable and healthy.

Later, when I decided to adopt two beautiful Sheltie pups, I was determined to learn more about pet nutrition and provide my boys with the best possible diet I could. I’m not a certified pet nutritionist, but most of us aren’t. Whether we’re feeding pets or humans, we learn as we go and do the best we can.

My goal with this blog is to share some of what I’ve learned along the way about cooking for your pet. I’ve focused on cooking for my dogs. The guidelines for cats’ nutritional needs are a little different, but many of the basics apply to both.

 

 

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