Natural Sources of Calcium

Here’s a list of calcium rich foods. Some dogs (like people) don’t tolerate dairy well. But if they can handle dairy, it’s packed with calcium. Two of my favorites are plain yogurt and cottage cheese. With any new food, introduce a small amount, one new food at a time, and watch for reactions. Also, canned foods may have ingredients added (like onions) that are not good for dogs, so read the label.

Personally, I don’t give my dogs ¼ cup of any of the foods below in a single meal, except sardines, salmon, and sometimes yogurt or cottage cheese. Try low-fat yogurt if calories or weight are a concern.

  Quantity Calcium
Eggshells, finely ground ¼ t. 200 mg
Sardines, with bones, canned 1.75 oz. 200 mg
Yogurt ¼ cup 112 mg
Salmon, with bones, canned 1.75 oz. 90 mg
Collard greens ¼ cup 72 mg
Dried figs* ¼ cup 60 mg
Cottage cheese ¼ cup 47 mg
White beans** ¼ cup 31 mg
Kale ¼ cup 25 mg
Edamame ¼ cup 25 mg
Parsley ¼ cup 20 mg
Okra ¼ cup 20 mg
Bok choy ¼ cup 18 mg
Quinoa ¼ cup 15 – 25 mg
Spinach ¼ cup 14 mg
Celery ¼ cup 12 mg
Carrots ¼ cup 9 mg

*Figs may cause stomach discomfort

** Beans may cause gas and should only be feed in small amounts

The Calcium Quandary

As I’ve been reading more about supplements—just like with people—there seems to be a lot of debate around the value and necessity of supplements. The one I’ve most often been told needs to be supplemented is calcium. Reading some of my books on the topic, I came across this quote by Wendell Belfield, D.V.M: It’s too much, not too little that bothers me most in regard to calcium.

Hypercalcemia  can cause increased thirst and urination, lack of appetite, vomiting, constipation, lethargy, and other symptoms. There is a blood test to check blood calcium levels, if you’re concerned.

Definitely, our pets need calcium. According to the National Research Council (NRC), dogs need about 50 mg per kilogram of body weight daily, that puts my 30-pound Shelties at needing 650 mg daily. Another guideline cited about half that amount, or less, depending on the author’s definition of size:[1]

  • Toy dogs, 100 mg.
  • Small dogs, 200 mg.
  • Medium dogs, 300 mg.
  • Large dogs, 500 mg.

Not that it’s anything new, but that’s a big difference in requirements. Intuition tells me our bodies must be a little adaptable because normal eating isn’t that balanced. But I’m not a scientist. I just do the best I can.

I do supplement, using what I consider a natural source of calcium—eggshells, finely ground into a powder. One whole medium-sized eggshell makes about one teaspoon of powder and has about 800 mgs of calcium. I give them ¼ teaspoon of ground eggshell daily

Some sources say that human bodies are more forgiving of imbalances in natural sources of nutrition, and I hope that’s true of dogs and cats too.

[1] Martin, Ann. Food Pets Die For. New Sage Press. 2008. p. 140.