Doggie Breath

Bad breath! Bah humbug! While my boyos don’t usually have nasty doggie breath, when I was treating them for tummy troubles, I found a side benefit to parsley water—fresh breath. Now I know why restaurants put that sprig of parsley on the plate.

Cooking up a batch of breath-freshening parsley water couldn’t be easier.

Recipe for parsley water

Boil a quart of water. When the water comes to a boil, turn off the heat. Drop a bunch of parsley (amount the amount you get at the store) into the water and let it soak for 3 minutes.

Pour a teaspoon of the parsley water on your dog’s food to help with upset tummies and to freshen breath.

A quart of water makes a lot of parsley water so you can freeze ½ cup or 1 cup portions for later use. Or make less and boil it up as needed.

There are lots of causes of bad breath in dogs, so—just as with humans—good dental practices like regular checkups and regular brushing are important. Parsley water won’t clean teeth or substitute for professional care.

Natural Sources of Calcium

Here’s a list of calcium rich foods. Some dogs (like people) don’t tolerate dairy well. But if they can handle dairy, it’s packed with calcium. Two of my favorites are plain yogurt and cottage cheese. With any new food, introduce a small amount, one new food at a time, and watch for reactions. Also, canned foods may have ingredients added (like onions) that are not good for dogs, so read the label.

Personally, I don’t give my dogs ¼ cup of any of the foods below in a single meal, except sardines, salmon, and sometimes yogurt or cottage cheese. Try low-fat yogurt if calories or weight are a concern.

  Quantity Calcium
Eggshells, finely ground ¼ t. 200 mg
Sardines, with bones, canned 1.75 oz. 200 mg
Yogurt ¼ cup 112 mg
Salmon, with bones, canned 1.75 oz. 90 mg
Collard greens ¼ cup 72 mg
Dried figs* ¼ cup 60 mg
Cottage cheese ¼ cup 47 mg
White beans** ¼ cup 31 mg
Kale ¼ cup 25 mg
Edamame ¼ cup 25 mg
Parsley ¼ cup 20 mg
Okra ¼ cup 20 mg
Bok choy ¼ cup 18 mg
Quinoa ¼ cup 15 – 25 mg
Spinach ¼ cup 14 mg
Celery ¼ cup 12 mg
Carrots ¼ cup 9 mg

*Figs may cause stomach discomfort

** Beans may cause gas and should only be feed in small amounts

The Processed Food Paradox

Everywhere we look these days, we’re being told fresh, whole foods are the healthiest option for humans. At the same time, vets often give me a sideways glance when I say I cook for my dogs. They tell me I have to be sure that my dogs’ meals are nutritionally balanced, and that most pet owners don’t take the time or have the knowledge needed to accomplish this goal. Not that I can guarantee the meals I prepare for my dogs are 100% nutritionally balanced, but I bet the meals I feed the boyos are more nutritionally balanced than what I feed myself.

And even if they’re not, I know I’m not feeding them cheap feed corn, sawdust, recycled restaurant grease, or road kill. Legally, dog food can contain all of those things and  “4-D” meat, including meat from dead, dying, or diseased animals.[1] Even euthanized animals can be “rendered” and added to what is labeled as animal or meat byproduct meal.

In addition to low-quality or contaminated meat, pet food manufacturers are also given a distressing amount of leeway in what they’re allowed to label as fiber. Animal hair, peanut hulls, and even ground-up paper can all be labeled as sources of fiber in pet food.[2]

While there are some foods humans thrive on but dogs shouldn’t have, the vast majority of healthy people food is also healthy dog food. The more I learn about what can be—and is—put in many dry dog foods, the less I worry about 100% “balanced” nutrition. This is not to say that ethical manufacturers don’t exist, but I guess we need to do our homework regardless of what we choose to feed the four-legged members of our family.

 

 

 

[1] Dog Food Advisor. The Shocking Truth About Commercial Dog Food. Accessed 6/12/2016 at http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-industry-exposed/shocking-truth-about-dog-food/

[2] Martin, Ann. Food Pets Die For. New Sage Press. 2008. p. 138.

Going Against the Grain…It’s been a scary journey

Opinions vary on what’s best for dogs—kibble, canned, cooked, or raw?  Most vets I’ve encountered advocate in favor of packaged foods like kibble and canned. The main argument being that those foods are “balanced.” The main reason I bring this up is because I chose to feed my dogs a cooked diet believing I could cook healthier foods than I could buy in packages. Packages that can sit on a shelf for months or even years and still be “fresh.”  The logic escapes me.

However, fresh food doesn’t automatically provide all the nutrients needed in a healthy diet. So where do we find support, encouragement, and direction?

Before I started cooking for my dogs, I read several books on the topic. Here are some of my favorites:

  • Food Pets Die For, Shocking Facts About Pet Food by Ann N. Martin
  • Becker’s Real Food for Healthy Dogs & Cats by Beth Taylor & Karen Shaw Becker, DVM
  • The Whole Pet Diet by Andi Brown

I’ve also found helpful information on these forums:

But books don’t provide encouragement or answer questions that come up along the way. Most of my support comes from a couple of friends who also cook for their dogs, but there are also online discussion groups and some vets who are interested and informed. In some cases you might be able to find a nutritionist who has specialized in raw or cooked diets for dogs and cats. Any of these could be good resources.

The reason I’m writing this post, though, is because it’s been a lonely and kind of scary journey. Judging the right path is a combination of intuition, observation, and doggy biometrics. My boyos are four years old; they’re happy, maintaining a healthy weight, and full of energy. They eliminate well and sleep well. Overall, they have good temperaments, though they are Shelties and tend toward the vocal and excitable. Blood tests done by their vet come back within normal range.

All the above leads me to believe I’m on a good path with their nutrition, but there are no guarantees. Many adverse effects of poor nutrition might not show up for years. I guess the same can be said of eating highly processed, preservative filled dry food. What are your thoughts on taking a road less traveled? Easy peasy or lonely and scary? How do you handle going against the grain?

Soaking Grains to Assist Digestion

Soaking and sprouting seeds and grains before consuming them is good for people and dogs. When you soak the rice, barley, quinoa, beans, or flax seeds you feed your dog a transformation takes place. These foods are typically hard to digest, but soaking grains and seeds activates enzymes, minerals, and other nutrients in these foods.

To soak grains before cooking, put them in a bowl and cover them with water. Leave the bowl at room temperature overnight. If you’re like me, and forget to soak these foods overnight, there is still benefit from a short soak. Try for at least 4 hours, but even 30 minutes helps to activate the beneficial enzymes and other nutrients.

You can also add 1 or 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar to the water for even better digestibility.

Foods Not to Feed Your Dog

Cooking for my dogs made me more nervous when I first started down this road than cooking for my son when he was an infant. Based on everything I know now that I didn’t know back then about what foods are good—and what foods aren’t good—maybe I should have been more nervous. With my son, though, I felt pretty familiar with foods people could eat. I knew the basic signs of allergy. And when he spit something out, I took that to mean he didn’t like a particular food.

My dogs like a wide variety of foods, but just like babies, they spit out foods they don’t like. I guess that’s the first category of foods not to feed your dog. Skip the foods they tell you they won’t eat. Sometimes those aversions are caused by allergies.

Allergies can show up at any age. Signs of allergies would be an indicator of the second category of foods not to feed your dogs. According to WebMD, signs of allergies in dogs include:

  • Red, moist, scabbed skin
  • Itching or scratching
  • Red, runny eyes
  • Sneezing
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Gassy, grumbly stomach

The third category of foods not to feed your dog are the ones that have been determined to be dangerous or toxic for dogs. These foods include:

  • Alcohol
  • Apple seeds
  • Artificial sweeteners, especially xylitol
  • Avocados
  • Baking powder and baking soda
  • Bones (cooked bones can cause choking and slivers can lacerate the digestive tract)
  • Candy, gum, and other sugary foods
  • Chocolate
  • Coffee, tea, and other products containing caffeine
  • Fat trimmings
  • Grapes and raisins
  • Milk and other dairy products, including cheese
  • Mushrooms
  • Nutmeg, paprika, and pepper
  • Nuts in general aren’t recommended, but especially macadamia nuts
  • Onions and chives (most broth contains onion so don’t make dog stew using broth from a store unless these ingredients aren’t listed. I’ve not yet found a broth without them.
  • Peaches and plums (the problem is the pits)
  • Raw eggs
  • Salt and salty foods like chips and salted popcorn (dogs do need some salt in their diet but not the amounts found in most snack foods)
  • Yeast dough

Although many sources recommend against garlic, there are others saying garlic is safe and beneficial.

This list isn’t exhaustive, so if you’re feeding a new food to your pet, it’s best to do some research beforehand. Just like people, your pet might have a food sensitivity or allergy even to foods that are generally considered safe for pets. Pay close attention to how your pet reacts to any new food and try to introduce new foods one at a time.

Let’s face it, some of these foods aren’t particularly good for people either, but most dogs are smaller than a full-grown adult and what seems like a small amount to us has a much greater impact on the dogs’ smaller bodies. Even small amounts of many of the foods listed above can cause organ damage, seizures, anemia, and a host of other problems. Whether feeding a home-cooked diet to your pets or supplementing kibble, the foods above should be avoided.

 

Detailed Costs of Cooking Homemade Dog Stew

Is cooking for dogs expensive?

When I tell people that I’ve been cooking homemade dog food for my Shelties for the past 4 years, the first question I get is: Isn’t cooking for your dogs expensive?

The short answer: It’s only a little more expensive than the high-end kibble on the market.

The long answer: Yes, it’s more expensive and takes more time, but it’s worth it because of several reasons.

  • My dogs and I enjoy cooking day. Tino lays down in front of the oven and guards his dinner while it simmers (proof is in the picture for today’s post).
  • I know what ingredients are in their food, and I’ve chosen high-quality meats and vegetables. I can’t afford all organic, but I do use mostly organic fruits and vegetables. I look for meats that are hormone and anti-biotic free.
  • Just as with people, healthy living starts with healthy eating. Healthcare companies for people are promoting healthy living as a way to reduce overall healthcare costs and reduce the risks of obesity and diabetes. If that works for people, might it not work for our pets also?

Are you wondering if cooking for your pet is right for your lifestyle? Check out these factors that I’ve found important to consider in the post Is Cooking for Your Dogs Right for Your Lifestyle?

If you shop for specials on meat, it’s possible to reduce the costs of cooking homemade dog food to less that what I’ve estimated my costs to be. When I shop for the ingredients I buy to make my home-cooked dog food, I buy in bulk so I’m pretty confident about the costs I’m sharing, but there are factors that will impact your per-pet costs. Four that come to mind are

  • the size of the dog,
  • supplements given,
  • inflation (as food costs go up, so will the cost of these recipes), and
  • the cost of the ingredients. Choosing organic ingredients definitely raises the cost.

To be sure that you have a good idea of how accurate these costs are, this information is based on prices I paid at a Costco store on January 21, 2016. I’ve also figured the weekly cost assuming only one type of meat is used, but more often than not I combine meats.

For example, I use half chicken thighs and half chicken breasts. To reduce the fat content of the stew cooked with red meat, I usually mix about ½ ground turkey with ¼ bison and ¼ ground beef. A stew made with all bison would cost a fortune!

I occasionally feed my boyos fish as well, but I haven’t made fish stew. If anyone has, I’d love to hear your thoughts. Keep in mind, there are a lot of variables. My numbers are based on my choice of ingredients, and I’m sure you can cook for less and still produce a tasty, healthy stew.

Chart of ingredients and costs per week based on the ingredients I use

Ingredient Quantity Cost per/[quantity] Total cost/week
Chicken thighs 5 pounds $1.99/lb. $9.95
Chicken breasts 5 pounds $2.99/lb. $14.95
Ground turkey 5 pounds 2.79/lb. $13.95
Organic ground beef (85% lean) 5 pounds 5.59/lb. $27.95
Lean ground bison 5 pounds 7.60/lb. $38.00
Veggies, frozen mix 2 cups 1.80/lb. $1.80
Grains (averaged because I use a variety of different grains including rice, quinoa, and pearl barley) 1 cup .10/oz. $0.80
Optional supplementation      
Yogurt 28 oz. .15/oz $4.20
Cottage Cheese 28 oz. .18/oz. $5.04
Canned pumpkin 32 oz. .19/oz. $6.08
Sardines 7.5 oz. .34/oz. $2.55
Calcium I grind up egg shells from eggs I consumed so consider this free
Vitamin 3.5 teaspoons .73/serving $2.55

You can take a look at one of the recipes I use with chicken thighs and breasts as the meat ingredients.

Summary of costs to cook homemade stew for dogs

Based on the above estimates, the total cost of the stew ranges from $15.05  to $33.06 per week. At most, I use an all red meat mix once a month. On average, the cost per month for two 25-lb. or one 50-lb. dog should be about $60 – $80.

Comparison to kibble based on one friend’s experience

A friend who feeds her 40-lb. Aussie mix a high quality kibble told me it costs her about $45/month for the kibble. She also gives Misty cottage cheese with each meal because Misty enjoys it. She supplements with a multi-vitamin on the advice of her daughter-in-law who is a vet.

Additional costs

Overall costs to feed your dogs will vary depending on the additional foods you give them and the type and quality of supplements. I’ll go into more detail about the extras I give my boyos in future posts. Not all are required, but from my research, it’s very important to supplement calcium when feeding a home-cooked diet. Calcium along with a good multi-vitamin should put to rest most concerns voiced by veterinarians concerned about a balanced diet.

A note for cat owners

I hesitate to write too much about home-cooked stew for cats, but I would venture to say that costs will be similar (adjusting for weight) because the main difference I’ve uncovered in my research is the protein requirement, which is higher for cats. The books I’ve read describe some heartwarming results for cats that weren’t doing well on commercial cat food. If you are a reader or visitor who has personal experience cooking for cats, I’d welcome your insights so please leave comments and share resources you’ve found valuable.

Choosing Between Cooked or Raw Food Diets for Dogs

When I was first researching feeding options for my pups, I was introduced to a wonderful woman who was feeding her dogs raw food. After all, it’s nature’s way. I did try feeding raw meat to my boyos but decided to go with home cooked food for three reasons:

  • Raw foods carry potentially dangerous parasites and bacteria like eColi
  • My guys tried to swallow such large chunks of meat that they nearly choked on more than one occasion
  • Cooked vegetables are easier for my guys to digest

Supporters of feeding raw say that dogs have natural protections against bacteria and parasites that humans don’t have. Some of the vets I know and respect say that’s not necessarily true. I prefer to err on the side of caution so I decided to go with cooked meals. I’ve also found that cooked veggies are easier for my dogs to digest. In other words, there’s a lot less waste!